Ttc Collective Bargaining Agreement

It is apparent from all the evidence that the TTC did not take all appropriate and practical measures to protect bargaining unit staff from this type of harassment by Community members, as required by the HRC, the Workplace Harassment Agreement and Directive. The evidence shows many insufficient responses from @TTChelps to offensive tweets of this type, such as: (1) Ignore offensive language and simply tell the speaker “You can call us at 416-393-3030 or go to ow.ly/AKsGz to report your experience”; (2) respond by saying, “We understand your concerns, but please do not put yourself in the personal attack on workers”, but then give information on how you can file a complaint; (3) Answer “Can you please not use vulgarity and explain what happened?”; or (4) by simply finding that the TTC does not tolerate any offensive, profane, derogatory or offensive comments (para. 133). With the new collective agreement, ATU Local 113 is asking the new Toronto City Council and TTC to join us in addressing the provincial government`s threat to split the TTC by taking its subway and putting it on the overtaking path to privatization, fare increases and reduced passenger service. Your injunction to Council – By-law No. 157/20 – states that the City of Toronto may ignore our freely negotiated collective agreement and require workers to change jobs and working hours, withdraw seniority rights and even assign work to private contractors and volunteers, all at the request of the employer and despite our collective agreement negotiated between them. As part of this general empowerment, the by-law authorizes municipalities to take a series of specific measures that replace laws, regulations, ordinances, directives, agreements or agreements, including a collective agreement. This means that municipalities can take such measures without complying with a collective agreement, including its provisions on dismissal, seniority/service or emergency measures. But Kaplan rejected these proposals and wrote in its decision that there was no proven need for such a “drastic change” to the terms of the collective agreement. “Toronto`s hard-working transit workers welcome the new collective agreement that recognizes our important role in the communities we serve with fair wages and benefits.

From the beginning of the process, ATU Local 113 came to the table in good faith to negotiate a deal and, despite the TTC`s efforts to reduce, reduce and suspend the talks, the arbitrator agreed that the contract follows years of negotiated solutions and is not based on drastic and unfair concessions. The arbitrator also rejected the TTC`s assertion that City of Toronto workers were an appropriate comparison with our 11,000 qualified people in transit and accepted that comparisons with Metrolinx, Mississauga MiWay and Brampton Transit were more appropriate. Let us be clear, whatever the outcome, interest rate arbitration does not replace the charter`s fundamental right to free collective bargaining denied at ATU Local 113 with the removal of the right to strike by previous governments. While asserting that the union was satisfied with the arbitration award, he asserted that arbitration “does not replace the charter`s fundamental right to free collective bargaining denied to ATU Local 113 with the suppression of the right to strike by previous governments.” 1. . . .